Body Service – Body Medical Contouring http://bodymedicalcontouring.com/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 00:14:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/default1.png Body Service – Body Medical Contouring http://bodymedicalcontouring.com/ 32 32 After 3 attempts, Veterans Toxic Exposure Bill – the PACT Act – finally passes the US Senate https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/after-3-attempts-veterans-toxic-exposure-bill-the-pact-act-finally-passes-the-us-senate/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 00:14:51 +0000 https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/after-3-attempts-veterans-toxic-exposure-bill-the-pact-act-finally-passes-the-us-senate/ WASHINGTON, DC — Victory cheers and tears of joy erupted in the US Senate chambers on Tuesday as the Legislature finally passed legislation that will provide health care and disability compensation to millions of veterans who have contracted environmental illnesses while in service. The 86-11 vote on the Sergeant First Class Heath Robinson Honoring Our […]]]>

WASHINGTON, DC — Victory cheers and tears of joy erupted in the US Senate chambers on Tuesday as the Legislature finally passed legislation that will provide health care and disability compensation to millions of veterans who have contracted environmental illnesses while in service.

The 86-11 vote on the Sergeant First Class Heath Robinson Honoring Our Promise to Address Comprehensive Toxics Act, also known as the PACT Act, came six days after the bill failed to legislate in the Senate. That failure sparked protests and a 24-hour vigil by veterans and family members at the US Capitol, drawing national attention to the plight of troops with diseases associated with living and working near outdoor landfill incineration pits associated with or exposed to radiation, herbicides and other chemicals encountered on battlefields.

“These leaders are making history here,” said Rosie Torres, who founded the advocacy group Burn Pits 360 more than a decade ago with her husband, former Army officer Le Roy Torres, and others. “I want to recognize the veterans who haven’t gone home, the ones who have been walking the halls for 13 years. … We have done everything for the fallen who are not here.”

Continue reading: Tricare starts charging for telemedicine appointments but makes phone visits permanent

The bill now goes to President Joe Biden’s desk. He is expected to sign it in the coming weeks.

The move followed several days of negotiations between Senate Democrats and Republicans that resulted in three lawmakers offering changes on issues such as paying for the legislation and protecting the Department of Veterans Affairs’ private health program from being overwhelmed by an influx of new patients.

Ultimately, the measure sailed past the 60 votes required to pass the law.

“They did that. They never gave up, and we won,” Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York said after the vote to the veterans crowd in the Capitol.

The Senate voted 55-42 on July 27 to pass the bill. But it fell short of the 60 needed for a final vote.

The failure sparked outrage among veterans and advocates, who have campaigned for years to ensure access to health care and disability benefits for post-9/11 and other era veterans who have inhaled chemicals or been exposed to carcinogens during their service .

Veterans camped out in 90+ degree heat, high humidity and driving rain and storms to force the Senate to make another decision. For six days, sympathetic senators, VA Secretary Denis McDonough and attorneys including comedian Jon Stewart brought food, water and other support to those camped on the Senate steps.

The bill had already passed the Senate by an 84-14 vote in June and appeared to be on a glide path to becoming law. But shortly after the Senate vote, House lawmakers discovered language that violated the constitutional requirement that tax-related matters originate in the lower house. The problematic section would have created a tax incentive to encourage healthcare workers to move to rural VA facilities.

The House of Representatives then earlier this month passed a version of the bill without the tax language by a vote of 342 to 88 and sent it back to the Senate; this vote failed.

But the third time was the appeal.

Stewart, who has worked for months to bring the issue before lawmakers – including the president, who mentioned arson pits in his State of the Union address this year – said he was “relieved.”

“I’m just relieved, man. So happy about that [the veterans] can finally go home,” Stewart said in an interview with Military.com after the passage.

“Today’s passage of the PACT Act is a milestone for veterans of all ages, conflicts and their families,” Tim Borland, national commander of Veterans of Foreign Wars, said in a statement after the vote. “Too many of our veterans have suffered the effects of toxic exposure over the years with no medical care, no compensation, and no support for their loved ones.”

The PACT Act will expand health care and benefits for post-9/11 veterans exposed to incinerator pits used in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere to incinerate garbage and other environmental hazards such as volatile organic compounds, depleted uranium and petrochemicals .

The bill identifies 23 illnesses believed to be linked to military service and paves the way for veterans to receive expedited medical services and disability benefits without having to prove their illness is linked to military service.

The bill also includes provisions for veterans who have served in previous conflicts. It would expand the benefits for Vietnam-era veterans who developed hypertension as a result of exposure to Agent Orange. would allow veterans and family members sickened by contaminated water at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina to file lawsuits; and expanding coverage for veterans exposed to radiation during hazardous cleanup operations in the 1960s and 1970s.

Proposed changes to the legislation included one by Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., who proposed the bill be funded primarily from discretionary appropriations, the amount of which will be determined and determined by Congress each year, rather than from mandatory expenditures that are automatic in each budget cycle would have to be financed.

A second was offered by Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., who tried to defray the bill’s costs by cutting funding to the U.S. Agency for International Development, while Sen. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn. , a change offered to allow veterans in the VA health care system immediate access to community care.

All three failed.

The Congressional Budget Office estimated the bill would cost more than $278 billion over the next 10 years.

VA Secretary McDonough said the department would work to ensure the expansion needed to meet the needs of newly eligible veterans would not delay or disrupt care for veterans currently in the system.

“This is a very important law. I think it would be very difficult to implement, but often the most important things are difficult and I think we’re ready for that,” he said during a hearing in June.

“I am pleased. I think this bill will save lives. I think he will support the veteran community,” Samantha Turner, a former Army officer, said after the vote. “But I’m also frustrated. I want to make sure that veterans’ lives and veterans’ legislation are never used as political football ever again.”

.– Patricia Kime can be reached at Patricia.Kime@Military.com. Follow her on Twitter @Patriciakime.

— Drew Lawrence can be reached at draw.lawrence@military.com. Follow him on Twitter @df_lawrence.

Related: Estimated costs of toxic exposure are more than a quarter trillion dollars, but bipartisan support holds

Read complete message

© Copyright 2022 Military.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, transcribed or redistributed.

]]>
Law enforcement officials from across the US in town to commemorate a killed RPD officer https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/law-enforcement-officials-from-across-the-us-in-town-to-commemorate-a-killed-rpd-officer/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 22:13:00 +0000 https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/law-enforcement-officials-from-across-the-us-in-town-to-commemorate-a-killed-rpd-officer/ Thousands of law enforcement officers have paid their respects to Rochester Police Officer Anthony Mazurkiewicz, who was shot dead during an investigation last month. There was a steady stream of mourners at Perinton’s office hours on Sunday, including members of various motorcycle clubs, some of whom stood silently beside their bikes with American flags on […]]]>

Thousands of law enforcement officers have paid their respects to Rochester Police Officer Anthony Mazurkiewicz, who was shot dead during an investigation last month.

There was a steady stream of mourners at Perinton’s office hours on Sunday, including members of various motorcycle clubs, some of whom stood silently beside their bikes with American flags on Route 31 outside the Keenan funeral home.

Mazurkiewicz was killed on July 21, shot while sitting in his unmarked police car. His partner Sino Seng was injured but is recovering, and a 15-year-old girl was also injured. A 21-year-old Massachusetts man faces murder and other charges.

RPD Lieutenant Greg Bello said law enforcement officials from across the US and Canada were in town to pay their respects.

“That’s really how Tony was, just the great guy and the great cop that he was,” Bello said. “I mean 29 years, almost 30+ years in law enforcement, he’s dedicated his entire life and now sadly the end of his life to our community and the safety of our community. So to have this abundance of support is humbling to say the least.”

On Sunday evening, the City of Perinton invites parishioners to “Light Perinton Blue” along a processional route from that city to downtown Rochester.

This procession is expected to leave the Keenan Funeral Home around 8:30 or 9:00 p.m. Sunday to take the body of Officer Mazurkiewicz to the Public Safety Building in Rochester.

The townspeople are invited to use their cellphones to play a YouTube video of Perinton that contains a blue commemorative image and also to place a piece of tape over their phone’s flashlight and paint the tape with a blue marker.

The funeral is scheduled for Monday noon at the Blue Cross Arena. It will be attended by thousands of law enforcement and other local and state first responders, as well as family members and some political leaders, including Gov. Kathy Hochul.

The public is not personally invited to the service, but can follow the service via live stream.

WXXI-WORLD TV (spectrum cable channel 1275 and digital over-the-air channel 21.2) and City 12 (spectrum cable channel 1303 in the city of Rochester) will have the live video; You can also watch live streaming videos at wxxinews.org.

WXXI Radio will broadcast audio from the service on AM 1370 and FM 107.5, and audio and video will both be streamed at wxxinews.org

Due to the funeral service, there will be several road closures on Monday morning.

The following roads will be closed to traffic from 08:00 on Monday:

  • Broad Street from South Avenue to S. Fitzhugh Street
  • Court Street from South Avenue to Exchange Boulevard
  • Interchange the boulevard from Main Street to S. Fitzhugh Street
  • South Avenue from Main Street to Broad Street
]]>
Rail strike brings widespread disruption to UK | rail strikes https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/rail-strike-brings-widespread-disruption-to-uk-rail-strikes/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/rail-strike-brings-widespread-disruption-to-uk-rail-strikes/ Rail travelers across the UK face another day of widespread disruption on Saturday due to a strike by train drivers at seven train companies. The industrial action by members of the Aslef union represents the largest drivers’ strike in decades and will halt service for some train operators. Services affected include West Midlands Trains traveling […]]]>

Rail travelers across the UK face another day of widespread disruption on Saturday due to a strike by train drivers at seven train companies.

The industrial action by members of the Aslef union represents the largest drivers’ strike in decades and will halt service for some train operators.

Services affected include West Midlands Trains traveling to sports venues around Birmingham, the host city of the Commonwealth Games.

Railway bosses have accused the union of targeting the opening weekend of both the games and the new English Football League season.

Intercity connections on LNER, which runs from London via Leeds to Scotland, will be greatly reduced. Great Western Services will be severely restricted. All Heathrow Express trains will be canceled and there will be no GWR trains west of Bristol to Wales.

There will be minimal Greater Anglia service and only one Hull Trains service in each direction. Trains will not operate on Southeastern, and most London Overground services will also be discontinued.

Other train operators such as Southern and Thameslink have warned services could become overcrowded and disrupted as passengers switch to alternative services.

The AA Motoring Organization, meanwhile, has issued a “yellow alert” warning that peak-time train strikes will contribute to severe road congestion, with more trips expected due to sporting events and holiday getaways.

Some rail disruptions are expected to last through Sunday.

The drivers’ action escalates a bitter wage dispute at the railways and follows shortly after the most recent nationwide strike by members of the RMT union. About 40,000 RMT members, including Network Rail signalers and onboard staff at 14 train operators, went on strike Wednesday.

Further strikes are planned by Aslef for August 13 and by the RMT for August 18 and 20, when simultaneous industrial action by the TSSA union could reduce the number of support workers available, meaning even fewer trains are likely to run.

Industry body Rail Delivery Group said it was “really disappointed” that the union was taking action to disrupt the plans of millions of passengers, particularly those hoping to attend the sporting events.

Sign up for the daily Business Today email or follow Guardian Business on Twitter at @BusinessDesk

RDG urged passengers to plan ahead and check the latest travel advice, saying anyone with pre-sale tickets can use them, change them or request a refund until Tuesday.

Aslef Secretary General Mick Whelan said: “We regret the disruption caused. We understand this happens when we take industrial action, but it is up to the companies to rectify this.”

Whelan said the strikes were “a last resort” but many of its members had not received a pay rise in three years despite working through the pandemic, and high inflation meant they were taking a real pay cut.

]]>
Oregon Health Authority is stepping up air conditioner distribution to at-risk groups and offering tips to stay cool https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/oregon-health-authority-is-stepping-up-air-conditioner-distribution-to-at-risk-groups-and-offering-tips-to-stay-cool/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 06:23:15 +0000 https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/oregon-health-authority-is-stepping-up-air-conditioner-distribution-to-at-risk-groups-and-offering-tips-to-stay-cool/ PORTLAND, Oregon — The Oregon Department of Health has increased air conditioning distribution to those most at risk of heat-related illnesses, while offering tips on staying cool in extreme heat. In addition, the agency is reminding Oregon employers of a rule that requires them to take steps to protect workers from the dangers of intense […]]]>

PORTLAND, Oregon — The Oregon Department of Health has increased air conditioning distribution to those most at risk of heat-related illnesses, while offering tips on staying cool in extreme heat.

In addition, the agency is reminding Oregon employers of a rule that requires them to take steps to protect workers from the dangers of intense heat. Such steps must be taken when the temperature reaches or exceeds 80 degrees.

The National Weather Service is forecasting rising temperatures throughout the week. They are expected to hit over 100 degrees by Tuesday in Pendleton, Redmond and the Portland metro area, with Medford hitting 108 degrees. Temperatures are expected to remain above 100 in all parts of the state through at least Friday.

The program, which provides air conditioning to vulnerable Oregon residents, including older adults, homebound individuals and those with medical conditions aggravated by heat events, was established following the passage of Senate Bill 1536 during the 2022 legislative session. The bill provides $5 million for air conditioning purchases for high-risk Oregonians who are eligible for medical assistance through OHA, the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), or Medicare, or have used any of those services in the past 12 months have claimed. The law also allows the units to be installed in homes even if they aren’t allowed in a homeowner’s or tenant’s contract, as long as they don’t pose a safety risk.

Over the weekend, OHA—with coordination and support from ODHS—delivered about 500 AC units with help from three community-based organizations: Portland Open Bible Church, Rockwood Community Development Corporation, and Somali American Council of Oregon. OHA is sourcing an estimated 3,000 units this summer and has received approximately 1,000 so far. OHA will be working with additional community-level organizations to distribute AC units in the coming days.

Coordinated Care Organizations (CCOs) can purchase AC units directly and help with increased utility bill costs for their registered OHP members through their flexible service offerings. Members registered with a CCO may call Member Services to inquire about flexible services.

“Climate change has made extreme heat events during Oregon’s summer months the norm, not the exception,” said OHA Director Patrick Allen. “These conditioners are a necessary step in building resilience to this health threat, especially for those most vulnerable to heat exhaustion, heat stroke and death.”

Another important step is the development of a new heat rule, passed in May at the request of Gov. Kate Brown, that protects Oregon workers, including those whose jobs require them to be outside. Oregon Occupational Safety & Health (OSHA) states that workers have a right to a safe and healthy workplace, including the right to raise a safety or health concern without retaliation, and reminds employers of their duty to protect workers from the hazards of high levels Heat protect heat rule.

The rule covers access to shade and cool water, preventative cool-down breaks, and prevention plans, information and training. Oregon OSHA offers employers free resources to help them comply with the rule. These resources include consulting services, technical experts, factsheets on key Heat Rule requirements, and online training.

If workers who raise safety or health concerns do not believe their concerns are being addressed, they can file a complaint with Oregon OSHA.

Finally, the OHA continues to warn Oregon residents about the risk of heat stroke and heat exhaustion during extreme heat events. Heatstroke can be fatal, with symptoms such as high body temperature (103 degrees or higher); hot, red, dry, or clammy skin; Headache; Dizziness; nausea; and confusion. Heatstroke is considered a medical emergency and should be called 911.

Heat exhaustion symptoms include profuse sweating; cold, pale, clammy skin; rapid, weak pulse; tiredness or weakness; nausea or vomiting; muscle cramps; Dizziness; Headache; and fainting. People with heat exhaustion should be taken to a cool place and given a cool bath, wet towels to cover their bodies, and water to swallow. See a doctor if symptoms worsen or last longer than an hour.

OHA offers the following tips to stay safe and healthy during extreme heat:

  1. stay calm
    • When the temperature is high, stay in air-conditioned places if possible. To find cooling centers in Oregon, call 211 or visit https://www.211info.org/get-help/housing-shelter/extreme-heat-cooling-centers/?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery
    • Avoid sun exposure between 10am and 4pm when UV rays are at their strongest. Try to plan morning and evening activities.
    • Open the windows to allow fresh air to circulate, especially in the mornings and evenings, and close the blinds on the west-facing windows in the afternoons.
    • Use portable electric fans to extract hot air from rooms or draw in cooler air.
    • Wear loose-fitting clothing to stay cool and protect your skin from the sun.
    • Use cool compresses such as B. a towel dipped in cold water, mist and cool showers and baths.
    • Avoid hot foods and heavy meals; They add heat to the body.
    • Never leave infants or children in a parked car. Pets should also not be left in parked cars – they too can contract heat-related illnesses.
    • Dress infants and children in loose, light, light-colored clothing.
    • Use sunscreen with at least SPF 15 when you go outside.
  2. drink enough
    • Regardless of your activity level, drink plenty of fluids, even when you’re not thirsty and especially when working outdoors.
    • Avoid alcohol or liquids that contain a lot of sugar.
  3. stay informed
    • Keep track of the temperature and heat index as you plan your activities so you can find ways to stay cool and hydrated. The heat index measures how hot it feels outside when humidity is factored in with actual air temperature. Visit the National Weather Service Clocks, Warnings or Advice for Oregon Site or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Heat and health tracker for the latest.
    • Learn how to prevent, recognize and treat heat-related diseases. Know the warning signs of heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, sunburn and heat rash and how to treat and prevent them.

People with chronic conditions such as heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer or kidney disease are less able to perceive and react to changes in temperature. They may also be taking medications that can worsen the effects of extreme heat. People in this category should be closely monitored to make sure they’re drinking enough water, have access to air conditioning, and know how to stay cool.

Those who exercise or work outdoors in extreme heat are more likely to become dehydrated and get heat-related illnesses and should take extra care to stay as cool and hydrated as possible.

For more information visit:

Understanding Heat Advisories (OHA): https://www.oregon.gov/oha/ph/DiseasesConditions/CommunicableDisease/PreparednessSurveillanceEpidemiology/Documents/understandha.pdf

]]>
Should consumers decide the fate of medical students? https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/should-consumers-decide-the-fate-of-medical-students/ Sun, 24 Jul 2022 16:00:09 +0000 https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/should-consumers-decide-the-fate-of-medical-students/ Not only are minorities underrepresented in the medical profession, they are also underrepresented on the admissions committees that select future doctors. But if it were possible to increase the minority composition of medical school admissions committees, it would be possible to increase the diversity of the medical profession. Better yet, what if it were possible […]]]>

Not only are minorities underrepresented in the medical profession, they are also underrepresented on the admissions committees that select future doctors. But if it were possible to increase the minority composition of medical school admissions committees, it would be possible to increase the diversity of the medical profession. Better yet, what if it were possible to include members from the community on medical school admissions committees? How would that change the medical landscape? Finally, we hear time and time again that patients prefer to see a doctor who looks and speaks like them and has a similar cultural background.

The fact is, even without community members, the classes of recently matriculated and graduated medical schools have become increasingly demographically and socioeconomically diverse, with greater representation of women and racial and ethnic groups—Black, Latinx, and other people of color. Since a diverse physician population can better serve the diverse patient population in the United States, it is understandable why admissions committees go to such lengths to ensure diversity in their membership and practice “racially aware admissions” by recruiting students from diverse backgrounds and resumes life.

The idea of ​​involving people from the community to serve on medical school admissions committees is intriguing. My alma mater, the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University in Philadelphia, is a leader. As reported in Philadelphia investigators and a press release from Temple, five people who live and/or work in the community around the impoverished North Philadelphia medical school campus and its hospital helped interview hundreds of candidates for the medical school class that will start this fall should be included. And one of those members — a 33-year-old youth mentor and graduate student in Temple’s Department of Geography and Urban Studies — was a decision-maker on the 25-member admissions committee, along with faculty from the medical school and physicians.

Partnerships between medical schools and community members are nothing new – they generally exist to improve the health of the community. People with lived experience in the community may be able to identify social barriers to health and help suggest solutions. However, direct partnerships with admissions committees are rare. Temple is the only medical school I know of that includes longtime residents or neighborhood activists on their committee. The community interviewers have a combined experience of more than 30 years living or working in the Temple area and often have a background in community service.

Medical schools need to ensure a diverse student body fulfills its role in the community and strengthen its capacity to treat underserved local populations. In Temple’s case, according to a hospital report, 86% of hospital patients have government health insurance, either Medicare or Medicaid. Two-thirds of the people living in the hospital’s catchment area are Black or Hispanic, and the median household income is $35,405. It’s no surprise that Temple has one of the most diverse medical student bodies in the country — ranked sixth according to US News & World Report rankings.

The community members who were asked by Temple to participate in the admissions process received interview training and participated in virtual interviews with candidates lasting approximately 4 hours per week for approximately 7 months. Prospective students were asked why they chose Temple, what community means to them, how they would interact with marginalized groups and communities suffering from inequalities, and how they would handle sensitive clinical interactions—for example, end-of-life conversations with family members . Community members were also attuned to whether the candidates’ answers seemed real or rehearsed.

Race and ethnicity definitely play a role when applying to medical school, making it an incredibly hot topic. Some people worry about under-representation of minorities, while others are concerned about students who appear to be “over-represented” in medicine. The latter are primarily White and Asian Americans (e.g. Chinese Americans, Korean Americans, Indian Americans) and may be screened more closely than applicants from a different ethnic or racial background to discourage their influx into medicine.

The addition of community members to medical school admissions committees also raises some concerns. What makes these individuals qualified to assess the performance and merit of medical degree applicants? How will community members be reached, and will the process be fair and equitable? What will be the criteria for their selection? What prejudices, if any, do community members bring to the discussion? Will they be tougher on judging non-minority students applying for admission? Will their recommendations seek to compensate for the fact that black doctors are more likely to be pushed out of residency programs than white residents? How will community interviewers deal with the reality that medical students’ career priorities may not be practicing family medicine in their backyard—and will candidates be truthful about their career aspirations, or will they be intimidated and lie?

The medical profession has been skeptical about the value of community members in certain cases – for example, the use of undercover “mystery” or “secret” shoppers in doctors’ offices to provide feedback on the quality and nature of medical services. Similarly, online consumer reviews of medical services have appeared on many different public websites, not to mention social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Doctors’ reputations now depend on keyboard warriors criticizing doctors without shackles and usually without the benefit of quality control oversight.

On the other hand, the pharmaceutical industry has achieved positive results through the engagement of community members. Members’ contribution to clinical trial design has helped promote diversity and inclusion in controlled trials and participation in health research. Consumer participation in conducting clinical trials is not only increasing, but seems to be welcomed by most investigators, who have been encouraged by the FDA to enroll and retain diverse study populations through “sustained community engagement.” Ensuring diverse and inclusive clinical research is seen as an existential necessity.

Involving community members on medical school admissions committees is a bold experiment and work in progress. Initial experiences at Temple have been overwhelmingly positive. Approximately 90% of prospective students who took part in an anonymous survey said the community interviewer enhanced their experience and helped them better understand the school. According to Temple’s Associate Dean of Admissions, the goal is to enable a match so that the right students choose Temple, as this will help Temple select the right students. That fits perfectly, a win-win combination – as long as everyone agrees on what makes the “right” student.

Arthur Lazarus, MD, MBA, is a member of Journal of Physician Leadership Editorial Board, 2021-2022 Doximity Luminary Fellow and Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University in Philadelphia.

]]>
Amazon’s purchase of One Medical could adversely affect patient privacy https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/amazons-purchase-of-one-medical-could-adversely-affect-patient-privacy/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 10:08:18 +0000 https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/amazons-purchase-of-one-medical-could-adversely-affect-patient-privacy/ Comment on this story comment First, Amazon found out what I was reading. Then Amazon found out what I put in my house. It keeps track of what I desire as gifts. It started to look like what I see on TV. Next, Amazon bought my grocery store to learn what I eat. Now Amazon […]]]>

comment

First, Amazon found out what I was reading.

Then Amazon found out what I put in my house. It keeps track of what I desire as gifts. It started to look like what I see on TV. Next, Amazon bought my grocery store to learn what I eat.

Now Amazon wants to own my doctor’s office too. Perhaps one of the greatest companies in history will soon know more about me than I do – and that should make everyone uncomfortable.

My jaw dropped when I heard the news on Thursday that Amazon had bought One Medical, a digitally savvy primary care practice that I’ve trusted with my medical care since 2009. Broccoli? Will it tell my doctor if I drink too much beer? Will Amazon micromanage my doctor like its warehouse workers? Will it try to replace my health care with a Q&A from Alexa?

So I called one of America’s pre-eminent medical ethicists, Arthur Caplan of New York University’s Grossman School of Medicine.

“I think you should be feeling hyper nervous and a little depressed,” he told me. “Synergy makes a lot of economic sense, but for healthcare it can be lousy for consumers.”

(Amazon founder Jeff Bezos owns The Washington Post, but I review all technology with the same critical eye.)

We, the users, want technology to work for us. Here are our demands.

For some time now, it has been written on the wall that the consolidation of mega-corporations in the healthcare sector is imminent. Insurance giant Aetna merged with CVS. Amazon publicized its interest by buying online pharmacy PillPack and developing products like the Halo Band, a wearable device that collects body information and offers advice. And when Amazon gets into a business, it doesn’t just stay on the sidelines.

“This is another opportunity to amass a vast cache of personal data, to use that data and those relationships to further solidify Amazon’s dominance as an online intermediary for many goods and services,” said Stacy Mitchell, a Sharp Critic of the monopoly of tech giant Macht, who is co-executive director of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.

Amazon’s cross-industry tentacles give data a superpower to generate incredible insights about individuals – which it can use to find very precise ways to manipulate us and the economy. It’s probably not the best idea that our streaming services and healthcare are from the same company.

An Amazon spokesperson declined to answer my question about how good it is for consumers — or patients — to allow a company to have so much of our data.

Amazon executives often say the company is driven by “customer obsession.” That might be true for delivering products in two days, but I’ve seen little evidence over the past decade that the company prioritizes our privacy — or that it has the kind of ethical culture that encourages making the right decisions regarding the human impact can hit its technology. There are so many examples: Amazon eavesdrops on our conversations, its Ring Doorbell puts police surveillance on our doorstep, and Amazon Sidewalk cuts your internet connection without permission.

Amazon’s skewed priorities really came to mind when a colleague and I reviewed the Halo, its first health device — and arguably the most invasive technology I’ve ever tested. It asks you to undress and put on a microphone so it can create 3D scans of your body fat and monitor your tone of voice. No joke, a computer will tell you if you sound “condescending.” It would be funny if there wasn’t a very serious possibility that this company could soon own my doctor’s office and all of my medical records.

What did you agree to? The doctor check-in software collects your health data.

In order for patients like me to trust Amazon as the owner of One Medical, Caplan proposed four big questions we need to know the answers to Stat.

  1. Will Amazon commit to having One Medical see a doctor? Amazon said current One Medical CEO Amir Dan Rubin, who is not a doctor, will continue to run it. Surely Amazon has enough of its own MBAs – we need a doctor who represents our interests. One Medical should have a large patient town hall where they talk about it and answer our questions. Unfortunately, One Medical didn’t even email patients about the news on Thursday.
  2. Will Amazon commit to building a firewall between patient data and Amazon’s many other tentacles? Amazon spokesman Dan Perlet wrote via email: “As required by law, Amazon will never share One Medical customers’ personal health information outside of One Medical for the purposes of advertising or marketing other Amazon products and services without the customer’s express consent. But the devil is in the details of that last sentence: Yes, America has a health privacy law called the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. But HIPAA wasn’t written for the internet age; As I’ve found time and time again, many companies are finding perfectly legal ways to collect intimate health data for marketing and other purposes with the “consent” few patients knew they were giving. “I worry that combining a giant product retailer and marketer with sensitive healthcare data could result in a tsunami of targeted advertising that you probably don’t want,” Caplan said. I’m particularly wary of Amazon trying to trick patients into handing over their data to the e-commerce giant in exchange for discounts or even — imagine — an Alexa-based telemedicine service.
  3. How does Amazon plan to ensure doctors and nurses can meet their ethical responsibilities? Neither es nor One Medical answered my question. Medicine is no ordinary business: Now Amazon has a duty of care. “Putting patients first can mean defying subpoenas or, conversely, reporting gunshot wounds or abuse,” Caplan said. In its press release announcing the deal, Amazon quoted CEO Neil Lindsay as saying, “We see many opportunities to both improve the quality of the experience and give people valuable time back in their lives.” Treating doctors like his fulfillment center workers, whose days are monitored to the minute and pushed for efficiency? That sounds like a terrible doctor’s visit, even if Amazon is more efficient at the time-wasting things like sitting in the waiting room.
  4. What, if anything, will the government do to protect patients in a world of this kind of horizontal mega-merger? Will it update our aging health privacy law? Will it impose limits on the way Amazon manages patient data? “It’s not a done deal yet,” Mitchell said. “The antitrust authorities will look very closely at that.” But for all the talk of containing big tech, Washington hasn’t been very successful lately. On Thursday, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) wrote an open letter urging the Federal Trade Commission to investigate the deal, saying, “Amazon has a history of involvement in business practices that raise serious anticompetitive concerns.”

I’m giving Amazon and One Medical a month to convince me to stay here. After that, I’ll be looking for a new doctor’s office.

]]>
US Heatwave: Dire warnings issued as oppressive weather unfolds https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/us-heatwave-dire-warnings-issued-as-oppressive-weather-unfolds/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 17:14:00 +0000 https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/us-heatwave-dire-warnings-issued-as-oppressive-weather-unfolds/ That has warned leaders across the country: go to a cool place and see at a time. But parts of the Ohio Valley and Northeast — including New York City, Philadelphia and Boston — are also on heat alert Wednesday and are expected to remain hot at least through the weekend. In New York, residents […]]]>

That has warned leaders across the country: go to a cool place and see at a time.

But parts of the Ohio Valley and Northeast — including New York City, Philadelphia and Boston — are also on heat alert Wednesday and are expected to remain hot at least through the weekend.

In New York, residents are being urged to stay indoors in the coming days to avoid the “hazardous conditions that can lead to heat stress and illness,” said Jackie Bray, commissioner of the state’s Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Services.
In Boston, Mayor Michelle Wu declared a heat emergency through Thursday and announced at least 12 community centers will be open to anyone looking to cool off. More than 50 paddling pools will be available in city parks and playgrounds, she said.

“It is clear that a changing climate poses a risk to our health,” the mayor said. “I urge everyone to stay cool and safe and check on your neighbors during the week.”

Connecticut’s governor activated the state’s extreme heat protocol through Sunday, which will help in part ensure cooling centers are available.

Philadelphia declared a “heat warning” Tuesday noon through Thursday evening, urging people not to be outside and to use air conditioners or fans from noon to 5 p.m., the city said in an email to CNN.

The heatwave comes as President Joe Biden was set to announce new funding for communities experiencing extreme heat and steps to boost the offshore wind industry during a speech at a disused coal-fired power plant in Massachusetts on Wednesday.
And it’s not just the US: the climate crisis has sent weather around the world to the extreme, and this week a searing heatwave also swept across Europe.
Stay cool without air conditioning
Water is for sale outside a grocery store on Staten Island on a hot Tuesday afternoon in New York City.

Record highs were set in Oklahoma and Texas on Tuesday

The south-central US has already seen brutal temperatures over the past few days. Multiple record temperatures for that particular day were set in Texas and Oklahoma on Tuesday. That includes Wichita Falls, Texas, where 115 degrees on Tuesday broke a record of 112 set in 2018.
Heat Stroke: How to Recognize and Stop the Progressing Symptoms
As of Tuesday, the Austin area had hit 100 degrees on 38 of the last 44 days, according to the National Weather Service.

“We are asking people to conserve electricity to keep systems working,” Austin Mayor Steve Adler said Wednesday. “We’re asking everyone to do this so we can get through this together.”

The heat is struggling with the air conditioners. The Electric Reliability Council of Texas, which operates about 90% of Texas’ electric grid, set a one-day record for electricity demand on Tuesday and another record is expected on Wednesday, an ERCOT spokesman said.

In Oklahoma, where temperatures were highest 100 degrees In much of the state, extreme heat and drought have caused wildfires and rural water system outages Tuesday, Keli Cain, spokeswoman for the Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management and Homeland Security, told CNN.

The heat is contributing to bursting water lines in some Oklahoma communities, leading those communities to advise residents to boil their water. Because Oklahoma’s predominant soil type is loam, extreme temperatures constrict the soil, causing the soil to shift and pipes to rupture, according to the water division of the state Department of Environmental Quality.

Many communities are adopting water rationing policies, department spokeswoman Erin Hatfield said.

“In addition to line breaks, we are seeing water pressure drops due to increased water demand, and some communities are not able to fully fill water towers overnight,” Hatfield said.

Little Rock, Arkansas recorded its 10th day this year with temperatures of at least 100 degrees on Tuesday, according to the National Weather Service. The service warned Wednesday will be “another brutal day” with both hot temperatures and dangerous heat indexes.

In Texas, some prisons are without air conditioning

A number of correctional facilities across Texas do not have working air conditioning, the Texas Department of Justice said.

Not everyone can afford air conditioning during a brutal heat wave.  That's how they get along

“There are 100 units (Texas Department of Criminal Justice), 31 have full air conditioning, 55 have partial air conditioning and 14 have no air conditioning. We are taking numerous precautions to reduce the impact of hot temperatures on those detained in our facilities,” Amanda Hernandez, a spokesman for the department, told CNN in an email.

The state has had at least four heatwaves this season, a heatwave that has been affecting residents before summer officially began. And with the ongoing heat, some in the criminal justice system have become ill with heat-related injuries.

“In 2022, there were seven inmates who required medical care beyond first aid for heat-related injuries,” Hernandez said. “None was fatal.”

Chief Heat Officers help cities cope

As longer stretches of excessive heat have become more common, some local governments have hired chief heat officers to help direct the response.

Miami-Dade County Chief Heat Officer Jane Gilbert told CNN’s Don Lemon on Tuesday that Miami now has almost double the number of days with a heat index above 90 degrees than it did in the 1970s.

Hot records are beating cool records by more than 10 to 1 this year as Europe and the US brace for dangerous heat

“And we’re getting many, many more days with the heat index, the more extreme readings of 103, 105,” Gilbert said. “This not only affects people’s health, but also their wallets. Our outdoor workers cannot work long hours, they lose working hours. People can’t afford that air conditioner, the higher cost of electricity. It is both a health and an economic crisis. “

Those without air conditioning can stay cool by leaving windows open, using fans and draping cold towels around their necks, Gilbert said. She also suggested people check on their friends, family and neighbors.

“The elderly, young children and people with certain health conditions may be more vulnerable to the heat. It’s really important to look after those people and make sure they are able to take care of themselves,” Gilbert said.

David Hondula, director of the Office of Heat Response and Mitigation for Phoenix, echoed that assessment, saying, “Heat can affect anyone, we are all at risk.”

Hondula suggested paying special attention to community members who may not have access to regular housing.

“For example, if we see someone sleeping outside in the sun on a hot surface, don’t assume they’re just napping. There could be a true medical emergency there and a 911 call may be required,” he said.

Why heat and humidity are particularly dangerous

Heat is one of the top weather-related causes of death in the United States, according to Kimberly McMahon, program manager for public weather services at the National Weather Service.

“Heat affects everyone by limiting the body’s ability to cool down,” McMahon said.

High humidity only further limits this ability.

“Sweating removes 22% of excess body heat by redirecting heat to evaporate sweat,” said CNN meteorologist Robert Shackelford. “High humidity means there is more moisture in the air. Because there is significantly more moisture in the air, sweat evaporates more slowly, resulting in a slowdown in your body’s natural ability to cool. A day with high humidity can feel significantly hotter than the actual air temperature.”

Too much heat and humidity can lead to heat-related illnesses, including heat cramps, heat rash, heat exhaustion “and — worst of all — heat stroke, which can be fatal,” McMahon said.

This is what happens to your body in extreme heat
According to data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are an average of 702 heat-related deaths and 9,235 hospitalizations per year nationwide. And the threat is only increasing, according to the agency.

“Extreme heat is a real threat and needs to be taken seriously,” added McMahon.

Those more vulnerable to the high temperatures include outdoor workers, pregnant women, people with heart or lung conditions, young children, older adults and athletes, according to the CDC.

CNN’s Michelle Watson, Dave Hennen, Joe Sutton, Rebekah Riess, Paradise Afshar and Mike Saenz contributed to this report.

]]>
UK heatwave: Wales appears to be hitting record high as Britain sizzles https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/uk-heatwave-wales-appears-to-be-hitting-record-high-as-britain-sizzles/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 02:18:00 +0000 https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/uk-heatwave-wales-appears-to-be-hitting-record-high-as-britain-sizzles/ PARIS — Long a favorite spot for picnics and sunbathing, the lawns surrounding the Eiffel Tower have recently become the scene of angry protests. First came a social media campaign. Then a rolly by dozens of local residents. After a short time, a protester squatted down in a nearby plane tree for a hunger strike. […]]]>

PARIS — Long a favorite spot for picnics and sunbathing, the lawns surrounding the Eiffel Tower have recently become the scene of angry protests. First came a social media campaign. Then a rolly by dozens of local residents. After a short time, a protester squatted down in a nearby plane tree for a hunger strike.

The source of her anger? A plan to cut down more than 20 trees, some over 100 years old, around the tower to build a huge garden and reduce tourist congestion.

The controversy is just the latest in a row that has engulfed Paris City Hall in an attempt to green the city, a task that seems all the more urgent as searing temperatures descend on the French capital and the rest of Europe.

Local authorities are reshaping Paris’ cityscape to make it more climate-friendly, but a growing number of residents say widespread tree felling around the capital is paradoxically undermining the city’s green ambitions.

Trees are considered one of the best defenses against the radiation that contributes to the heat waves that are increasing everywhere due to global warming. They’re providing some much-needed coolness in dense cities like Paris, where temperatures were in the high 90s on Monday afternoon and are expected to rise.

Recognition…Andrea Mantovani for the New York Times

“Without the trees, the city is an unbearable blast furnace,” said Tangui Le Dantec, urban planner and co-founder of Aux Arbres Citoyens, a group protesting tree-cutting in Paris.

Small-scale protests have erupted across Paris in recent months, with residents and activists gathering around trees condemned by the sprawling urban development projects that have at times turned the capital into a massive construction site.

In April her filmed the felling of 76 mostly decades-old plane trees at the Porte de Montreuil on the northern outskirts of Paris. City Hall wants to turn the site into a giant square, part of a project by Mayor Anne Hidalgo to create “a green belt” around the capital.

“MS. Hidalgo, please stop the massacre,” said Thomas Brail, founder of the National Group for the Surveillance of Trees, as machines chopped down trees behind him Video He shot in April. Mr. Brail later went on an 11-day hunger strike in the plane tree near the Eiffel Tower.

Recognition…Andrea Mantovani for the New York Times

Yves Contassot, former deputy mayor of Paris in charge of the environment and a member of the Greens, said tree felling has “become a very sensitive issue that creates a certain scandal when we talk about the fight against global warming in big cities “.

The plan to renovate the traffic-calmed area around the Eiffel Tower initially seemed environmentally friendly to the Parisians. Most vehicles would be banned and a network of pedestrian lanes, bike lanes and parks would be created.

“A new green lung”, the town hall boasted on its website.

But residents discovered in May that the plan also meant cutting down 22 established trees and threatening the root systems of several others, including a 200-year-old plane tree planted well before the Eiffel Tower was built in the late 1880s.

“The poor tree was planted in 1814 and one morning some people want to make room for luggage storage and it gets swept away,” said Mr Brail, the protester who was staging a hunger strike in the tree, scoffing at plans to improve facilities for visitors.

Recognition…Thomas Coex/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

A series of protests, along with an online petition that garnered more than 140,000 signatures, finally forced the city council on May 2 to change its plans and promise not to cut down a single tree as part of the greening project.

Emmanuel Grégoire, deputy mayor of Paris in charge of urban planning and architecture, said in an interview that the city realized it was “losing a symbolic battle over the project’s green ambitions”.

In 2007, Paris adopted a climate plan that helped reduce the city’s carbon footprint by 20 percent from 2004 to 2018 and nearly double its use of renewable energy, according to a recent report by regional authorities. Paris’ new goal is to become a carbon-neutral city by 2050, powered only by renewable energy.

Mr Le Dantec, the town planner, acknowledged that “in terms of pollution reduction there has undoubtedly been an improvement”. He cited Ms Hidalgo’s successful, albeit controversial, plans to restrict car traffic in the capital.

But he added that Paris city plans had neglected another reality of climate change: rising temperatures, against which trees are believed to be some of the best defenses.

Recognition…Christophe Archambault/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Trees cool cities by providing shade and mitigating the effects of so-called “urban heat islands” that are prevalent in Paris by absorbing radiation. Météo France, the national weather service, has estimated that temperatures on these heat islands have sometimes been 9 to 18 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than surrounding areas during recent heatwaves.

In mid-June, as France was suffocating under searing temperatures, Mr. Le Dantec was wandering around Paris with a thermometer. On the Place de la République he has recorded Temperatures of up to 140 degrees Fahrenheit on concrete surfaces, compared to 82 degrees under a 100-year-old sycamore tree.

“Trees are our best protection against heat waves,” says Dominique Dupré-Henry, former architect at the Ministry of the Environment and co-founder of Aux Arbres Citoyens.

But of 30 major cities surveyed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Paris has the lowest tree coverage at about 9 percent, compared to London’s 12.7 percent and Oslo’s 28.8 percent.

“This is exactly the opposite of climate change adaptation,” said Ms. Dupré-Henry.

Mr Grégoire said Paris plans to plant 170,000 new trees by 2026. Using the example of Porte de Montreuil, the area north of Paris, he said far more trees were being planted than were felled.

Recognition…Andrea Mantovani for the New York Times

“It’s a project with very high environmental standards,” said Mr. Grégoire, highlighting the transformation of what is now a huge paved roundabout into a green space. “The result is positive in terms of combating urban heat islands.”

The regional environmental authorities are less confident. In their assessment of the project, they noted that the construction works and new infrastructure “will add more heat, on the contrary”.

Mr Le Dantec also said young trees are less effective than older ones in the short term at mitigating global warming because their foliage is smaller and cannot absorb as much radiation. “A 100-year-old tree is worth 125 new trees planted,” he said of absorbing carbon dioxide and cooling his surroundings.

At the Porte de Montreuil, residents had mixed feelings about the project. Lo Richert Lebon, a 57-year-old designer, praised the “green efforts” and said they would help improve the quality of life in this long-decaying suburb.

But “lawns aren’t worth trees,” she added, as she stood in the shade of plane trees about to be felled as part of a redesign of a flea market in the area. “Trees should be incorporated into this effort rather than being an adaptive variable.”

correction:

July 18, 2022

A previous version of this article incorrectly stated how much hotter Paris was than the surrounding area during the recent heat waves. In Paris, temperatures were 9 to 18 degrees Fahrenheit higher, not 40 to 50 degrees.

]]>
Nail technicians call for safer working conditions and more stable pay as Covid exacerbates risks https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/nail-technicians-call-for-safer-working-conditions-and-more-stable-pay-as-covid-exacerbates-risks/ Sun, 17 Jul 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/nail-technicians-call-for-safer-working-conditions-and-more-stable-pay-as-covid-exacerbates-risks/ Workers at nail salons in New York are pushing for industry-wide health and labor standards over fears working conditions have worsened amid the Covid pandemic. For the first time in the industry, nail designers, with the support of union officials, are campaigning to create a new council that would involve people at multiple levels – […]]]>

Workers at nail salons in New York are pushing for industry-wide health and labor standards over fears working conditions have worsened amid the Covid pandemic.

For the first time in the industry, nail designers, with the support of union officials, are campaigning to create a new council that would involve people at multiple levels – from government officials to workers to salon owners – to set healthier wages and labor norms. They are pushing for standards like set hours, meeting minimum wage requirements, health insurance, ventilation, and language access for immigrants throughout New York. While the council would work at the state level, proponents hope the effort will result in improved industry standards statewide.

Working conditions in nail salons have long been a concern for many, and the pandemic and slowing economy have exacerbated existing challenges. Nail technicians say work hours have become more irregular and that they are increasingly concerned about the safety of the products they use.

“We don’t want new nail salon employees to have to go through what we went through in the future,” said Sabita Lama, nail technician and nail worker at Adhikaar, a nonprofit community organization that’s part of the New York Healthy Nail Salon Coalition, which is translated by translator speaks Nepali.

The problems, one expert said, are complex because conditions and available resources vary widely in salons. While the New York law introduced earlier this year would help establish an industry standard, it has not yet been put to a vote.

But as the pandemic continues, many nail technicians and organizers say the issues demand urgency.

New York State has the highest concentration of nail technicians in the country, with 73% of this workforce made up of Asian and Pacific Islanders. And 88% were foreign-born. Many work in the industry because of the low barriers to entry, especially when the skills and education they have acquired in their home countries are considered non-transferrable in the US

However, nail technicians said the work is often grueling and they are not always paid fairly. Some salons comply with the minimum wage law but keep the tips and commissions workers earn from massages or other services, Lama said. And others may not comply with the federal minimum wage mandate of $15 an hour.

Salon workers in Queens, New York on May 11, 2022.Andrea Renault/AFP via Getty Images file

A report released in April by Cornell University’s Industrial and Labor Relations Institute also found that wage theft remains a “pervasive” problem in the industry. But different wage structures in salons make it difficult to enforce the minimum wage requirement or make it difficult for workers to even know when they are not being paid fairly. Researchers also wrote that “misclassification” of employees as independent contractors has also led to wage inequality, as independent contractors are not protected by minimum wage requirements and other labor laws.

As businesses continue to grapple with the pandemic, fewer and fewer salons are giving workers a fixed schedule with set hours, making it far more difficult to make a living, Lama added. Cornell’s report similarly found that nail designers were reporting unpredictable schedules during periods of slower business caused by seasonal changes and the pandemic.

As a result, “workers describe that their working hours have been reduced; For some, this happened in a more orderly fashion with a predictable winter schedule, but for many it has resulted in an unpredictable work schedule, where they may be sent home after three to six hours of work or, conversely, be suddenly called up on an unexpectedly busy day or under the Pressure to work extra time during busy periods like the holidays,” the report said.

Due to the inconsistent work and fears that their scarce hours could be reduced, some workers felt pressured not to report health concerns or issues they fear are arising from working with toxic chemicals over the years may have developed insufficient ventilation.

Pabitra Dash, a former nail salon technician, said she and her husband had been trying to conceive for years. But Dash said she suffered seven miscarriages during her eight years in the industry.

“Every time I saw the doctor, I was so scared,” said Dash, a Nepalese immigrant who is currently an organizer at Adhikaar. “Like, oh, she’s gonna tell me again that I miscarried.”

After leaving the industry, Dash was finally able to carry a child, she said. While the doctor never said the chemicals were the cause of her miscarriages, she seemed relieved when Dash revealed she was no longer working with nails, Dash said.

“She said, ‘It’s really good for your health and your baby,'” Dash said, recalling the conversation.

A 2012 study in the Journal of Law and Policy examining working conditions in nail salons notes that there was evidence that prolonged exposure to phthalates, the type of chemical used in some “personal care” products, has been linked to cancer, miscarriage and infertility.

In addition to potential reproductive issues, Lama said, many nail designers have reported breathing difficulties. Reports show chemicals have also been linked to cognitive development problems, cancer and irritation, according to Cornell’s report.

Lama herself had just returned from a two-month hiatus from the industry after developing a burning sensation in her throat.

Some said they were also concerned that health risks with Covid had worsened as more cleaning solutions were used to keep areas hygienic, Lama said. And not all companies provide or require employees to wear protective equipment such as gloves, masks or sunglasses for treatments that require UV light. While nail salons were imposed ventilation requirements in 2016 and had five years to meet them, Gov. Kathy Hochul’s administration pushed back the deadline to six more months. The requirements are currently scheduled to come into force in October.

With no mask or vaccination requirements for clients, salon staff also risk regular Covid exposure hazards. Despite the health risks they face every day, Lama said most nail technicians don’t have health insurance from their employer.

Miliann Kang, author of “The Managed Hand: Race, Gender and the Body in Beauty Service Work,” said analyzing the industry requires nuanced, multi-faceted approaches and consideration of the larger context in which many of these immigrant-run businesses operate in operation before effective solutions could be reached and implemented.

Kang warned against painting all salons with a broad brush and urged people to consider their business models on a case-by-case basis. While some establishments are run by conglomerates, others are mom and pop shops.

In smaller salons, owners often work as nail technicians themselves, with a small margin of profitability. Similar to other small businesses across the country operating amid the pandemic, nail technicians and other frontline workers have had to bear the brunt of the financial burden, Kang said. She emphasized that family businesses should not ignore labor standards and that solutions must be tailored to the respective business models.

And in examining the issues across the industry, customers also play a role in conditions, Kang said. Many clients put undue pressure on low-income immigrant salon workers and underestimate their manpower.

“A lot of people walk in expecting they’ll pay for a $15 manicure, but they want services that, honestly, they should pay $50 for,” Kang said.

Nail technicians work at Bona Nail Salon
Nail technician in New York on July 6, 2020.Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images file

Kang stressed that companies must be held accountable for the treatment of their employees. But, Kang said, examining these often Asian-owned companies in the context of race and the current economy is crucial. Many of the same pandemic-related stereotypes, in part, would have sparked the use of more chemicals, she said.

“These companies are already being falsely associated with contamination and infection fears,” Kang said. “They must be particularly vigilant in pushing back assumptions that have been exaggerated by the pandemic – that Asians are somehow impure or contagious carriers of disease.”

And all too often, health and safety concerns about exposure to chemicals rest solely on the shoulders of these owners, many of whom operate corner shops, Kang said. Although there are specific steps owners should take to mitigate the damage, Kang said manufacturers who develop these products should also be at fault.

“If the products contain toxic chemicals and they are not regulated, then it will create a toxic work environment,” Kang said. “It shouldn’t just be on them at the workshop level.”

A widely acclaimed bill, the Nail Salon Minimum Standards Council Act, was introduced in January by state Senator Jessica Ramos and Assemblyman Harry Bronson, both Democrats. The bill would create an industry council for nail salons, made up of workers, employers and government officials, that would set standards for wages and time off. It would also require an independent committee of economic experts to develop a fair floor pricing model.

While many say the bill can transform the industry by creating much safer jobs, it has not yet passed. In May, nail technicians protested outside the State Capitol building in Albany to pressure lawmakers. Lama said workers and activists stand ready to do whatever it takes to help get the law passed, no matter how long it takes.

“What we ask is a bare minimum,” Lama said.

]]>
A man missing since last week is found dead in an Indiana pond with his 3 young children https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/a-man-missing-since-last-week-is-found-dead-in-an-indiana-pond-with-his-3-young-children/ Wed, 13 Jul 2022 23:33:43 +0000 https://bodymedicalcontouring.com/a-man-missing-since-last-week-is-found-dead-in-an-indiana-pond-with-his-3-young-children/ Four bodies recovered from a pond in Indianapolis were identified Wednesday as those of a missing man and his three children. The Marion County Coroner’s Office said the deceased were Kyle Moorman, 27, Kyle Moorman II, 5, Kyannah Holland, 2, and Kyran Holland, 1, NBC affiliate WTHR reported. Moorman is the children’s father. The Indianapolis […]]]>

Four bodies recovered from a pond in Indianapolis were identified Wednesday as those of a missing man and his three children.

The Marion County Coroner’s Office said the deceased were Kyle Moorman, 27, Kyle Moorman II, 5, Kyannah Holland, 2, and Kyran Holland, 1, NBC affiliate WTHR reported. Moorman is the children’s father.

The Indianapolis Police Department issued a press release this week asking for the public’s help in locating Moorman and his children. They have been missing since July 6, when Moorman told his family he was going fishing, WTHR reported.

Police said they responded to a call just after 7:30 p.m. ET Tuesday and, with the help of fire department divers, recovered the body of a man who was pronounced dead at the scene.

Sonar technology later located a vehicle in the water. “This vehicle was pulled out of the water and three young children were found inside,” the statement said.

Officials did not confirm the identities at the time. In a statement Wednesday, police said there was “a commonality with the investigation into the missing persons of the Moorman family.”

Search and rescue teams worked Tuesday to recover a vehicle from a pond on Bluff Road in Indianapolis. Indianapolis Fire Department / Twitter

Deputy Police Commissioner Chris Bailey told WTHR that the vehicle matched the description of the car Moorman was driving when he was last seen. The same area was searched by officers on foot and with drones this week.

Police said a “death investigation” had been opened, adding that the Indianapolis-Marion County Forensic Services Agency was assisting.

]]>